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Plano Divorce Mediation Blog

Divorce mediation requires peaceful negotiation skills

In your daily life in Texas, do people often tell you that you're persuasive? Do your peers come to you with their problems because they trust your advice and have confidence in your problem-solving skills? Maybe you focused your career on helping others troubleshoot their problems.

Then again, you might consider yourself someone who becomes flustered or nervous when trying to discuss a disagreement with another person in order to resolve the issue. Maybe you feel intimidated when someone tries to convince you that his or her idea is best. Either way, if you're considering divorce mediation as a means to achieve settlement, you'll want to brush up on your negotiation skills.

Child custody: What terms should be part of your agreement?

Especially if you were married 10 or more years, not living with your spouse anymore may take some getting used to. Your children, in particular, may encounter challenges adapting to a new lifestyle where their parents live in separate households. Divorce isn't easy, but it doesn't necessarily have to ruin your kids' lives. By agreeing to mediate your divorce instead of litigating in a Texas courtroom, you're agreeing to try to settle your differences and design a child custody plan built on cooperation.

When your children see that you and your ex are willing to work together as a parenting team, they may be less worried about their future and better able to come to terms with the changes in their lives. Figuring out what exact terms to incorporate into your co-parenting plan can be challenging, however.

How the divorce mediation process works

You and your spouse have decided to call it quits, and you could not feel more relieved. You want to get on with your own life as quickly as possible. But you are worried that the process of going to divorce court will slow you down and give you an unwanted headache to boot.

The good news? You do not have to go to trial to complete the divorce process in Texas. Instead, you can go through the more amicable divorce mediation process. Here is a rundown on how the mediation process works from start to finish.

Avoid divorce stress: How to create a peaceful co-parenting plan

When you decided that you would rather move on in life without your spouse rather than stay in an unhappy relationship, you may have worried about how your decision would affect your children's lives. Divorce isn't easy, and the process of resolving child custody issues, financial issues and other important matters can cause a lot of stress. Like all good Texas parents, you want what's best for your kids.

You've probably heard horror stories about long, contentious court battles that have greatly disrupted children's lives and caused them a tremendous amount of stress. It doesn't necessarily have to be that way, however, especially if you and your spouse are willing to compromise and cooperate for your kids' sakes.

Ways to stay close to your kids after divorce

When you mediated your divorce, you may have been a bit anxious or worried about your children's ability to cope with the significant changes the situation would be prompting in their lives. You love your kids more than anything in the world, and you only want what is best for them. Most mediators agree that children fare best if they continue to spend ample time with both parents after divorce.

As a parent, you may encounter several challenges as you and your kids adapt to a new lifestyle and search for your new "normal" together. It's understandable that you might feel sad or frustrated, for instance, coming home from work and not having the kids there to spend the evening together. With a positive attitude and a strong support network, you can be proactive to maintain a close bond with your children.

Why mediation is often best option for Texas parents

The day you got married, it was unlikely that you imagined you would one day be getting divorced. In fact, like many Texas spouses, you may have been with your partner for 10 years or more and had several children before determining that your relationship was not working out as you'd hoped it might. Like all good parents, your kids are your top priority, which is why you want to find a way to settle your divorce as swiftly and painlessly as possible.

While you may no longer want to be married to your spouse, you understand that, as parents, you'll always have a connection in life. Parents in similar situations, who want to cut ties as spouses but avoid confrontation for the sake of their children, often choose divorce mediation instead of going to court.

Mediation is a win/win setup, or, at least, it is supposed to be

If your ultimate goal is to divorce in as swift and amicable a fashion as possible, then avoiding litigation might also be a top priority of yours. Thankfully, there are alternative options in Texas, such as divorce mediation, that can help you resolve your differences and execute a fair and agreeable plan, especially if you have children.

That's not to say that you're guaranteed to succeed if you choose to go the mediation route. There are certain pitfalls or downsides that could cause obstacles or delays toward your settlement. However, if you know how to avoid such problems ahead of time, you increase your chances for success.

Why you might think divorce mediation is the best choice

Whether you and your spouse have been married 10, 20 or more years, if issues have come between you that you've determined you cannot resolve, you might be in the process of considering your options for divorce. If so, you're definitely not alone in your discernment, as many Texas residents are likely navigating similar circumstances at this time.

It's good to know there are numerous options when it comes to settling what you need to settle and laying the groundwork to move on in life in separate directions from each other. If you have children, their well-being is undoubtedly one of your highest priorities. Their best interests may greatly influence the decisions you make regarding how to obtain an official settlement.

When is divorce mediation not the best choice?

As you embark on the road to divorce, you wonder how difficult the journey will be. Will you and your future ex remain at odds at every turn? Or is it possible for the both of you to find common ground and thus make the journey as smooth as possible?

The reality is divorce doesn't have to be an uphill battle with your future ex. By choosing mediation, you and the other party could have a relatively amicable divorce process rather than a hostile one. However, mediation is not expedient in every situation. Let's look at what mediation is and when mediation may not be the best option for you in Texas.

What skills do you most need for successful mediation?

Perhaps, in your youth, you were known as a skilled negotiator. Whether it was bartering for the last slice of pizza or convincing your friends where to hang out in your Texas town on a Friday night, maybe you had a special knack for getting your way. On the other hand, you might have been the one who always gave in because you'd rather keep the peace than try to sway people in your favor. Fast forward to adult life and preparing for divorce.

The good news is that it's often possible to settle a divorce without ever going to court. However, when you choose mediation over litigation, you should understand from the get-go that there will be a good bit of negotiation involved. Brushing up on such skills ahead of time will help you accomplish your goals.

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